Sunny Nash
Author - Producer
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My book, Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s, began when I was writing columns for Hearst and Knight-Ridder Newspapers in the 1990s. The columns were comprised of stories from my childhood in the Jim Crow South with my part-Comanche grandmother, Bigmama, my parents, relatives, friends, teachers and others in my life. I had no idea that these little vignettes would garner so much interest nationwide. But they did. With that, a managing editor at Texas A&M University Press, Mary Lenn Dixon, saw the merit in compiling these stories into a book and approached me about creating a manuscript of selected articles for review and eventual publication. What a break! I agreed. And the book was born. My book, Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s, was selected as a resource for understanding U.S. race relations by the Association of American University Presses. As a result, some authorities consider me a leading author on race relations, quoting me in articles and reference books, and including my work in anthologies.

Listed in the Bibliographic Guide to Black Studies by the Schomburg Center in New York, Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s is also recommended for Native American collections by the Miami-Dade Public Library System in Florida.

“Because my family has deep roots in Comanche heritage, Native American collections have begun to use my book to look at the connections it makes between African American and Native American bloodlines and culture.” 








Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's

Robin Fruble of Southern California said, “Every white person in America should read this book (Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s)! Sunny Nash writes the story of her childhood without preaching or ranting but she made me realize for the first time just how much skin color changes how one experiences the world. But, if your skin color is brown, it matters a great deal to a great number of people. I needed to learn that. Sunny Nash is a great teacher,” Fruble said.
My book features stories about life with my part-Comanche grandmother, Bigmama, before and during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s in the Jim Crow south. Although I wrote the book with emphasis on Bigmama, my mother, Littie Nash, wrestled with Jim Crow racism while giving me the life of a little princess with imagination and without the luxury of having a lot of money.

My mother did not waste compliments on me. She reserved accolades to celebrate real accomplishments, not just because I dragged myself out of bed before noon on Saturday or because I made an 'A' on my report card. My mother, Littie Nash, did not waste compliments on me or anyone else. She reserved accolades to celebrate real accomplishments, not just because I dragged myself out of bed before noon on Saturday or because I made an 'A' on my report card.  Read Comanches and Colored Girls
Bigmama Didn't Shop at Woolworth's


Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's is now on Amazon Kindle.

​​Be sure to visit my new How-To Blog, Make Money Using Words, designed to show the author how to become a content writer to build brand for a book or a product you sell online.